Friday, May 25, 2018

The History of the Skrulls

Secret Invasion Saga (Marvel, April 2008, free)
This freebie context setter would have been useful while reading New Avengers: Illuminati and Incredible Hercules #120—and will be useful to anyone exploring or revisiting the Secret Invasion event from a decade ago. Written by John Rhett Thomas based on research done by Jeph York, the 32-page synopsis incorporates exposition in the form of a briefing compiled by SHIELD's Maria Hill for Iron Man, combined with reproduced art from the original comics.



The text is laid out in pretty horrible computer typography, but it's still interesting reading. The issue covers most of the history of the Skrulls, at least in terms of how it relates to the Secret Invasion storyline. The artwork, a mix of new and old—with some original work for the framing introduction—has been edited and recolored, so it's not entirely true to the original publications. Artists range from John Byrne to Jim Cheung, with plenty of creators in between.

Similar in style to Marvel Saga, this kind of approach to a forthcoming event is an interesting idea, akin to best-of books like Wolverine Vs. the Marvel Universe.


Thursday, May 24, 2018

Accosted by Aliens

Pitt #1 (Image, January 1993, $1.95)
"Fight and Flight!" Pencils and inks: Dale Keown, Writer: Brian Hotton, Letterer: Chance Wolf, Colorist: Joe Chiodo.

The Detroit chapter of the Vipers motorcycle gang are "makin' the rounds" when they encounter a broad-shouldered mysterious figure who ends up having glowing red eyes, claws—and the ability to toss around motorcycles and take a blast from a shotgun. This, it seems, is Pitt.

Meanwhile, a young boy in Connecticut wakes from a nightmare. Police officers are investigating a superhuman they think might be a "Youngblood," examining a train car damaged in a fight—when they are accosted by aliens.



Having just come off working on The Incredible Hulk with Peter David before joining Image, Keown's book is a little heavy on the Hulk-style character design and action, but the alien assassin plot line seems promising, if underdeveloped in this first issue. (Who is the Seer? What are the Creed?)

Hotton's writing works well with Keown's art, and the issue is capped by a couple of pinups, including one by Sam Kieth.



Read Also: Youngblood #4.

Availability: This issue was collected in Correspondence of William Pitt Volume 1. You can check out Keown's start on the Hulk in Incredible Hulk Visionaries - Peter David, Vol. 5.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

A Trained Bird

Hawkman #17 (DC, December 1966, 12 cents)
"Ruse of the Robbing Raven!" Story: Gardner Fox, Art: Murphy Anderson.

The first of two stories in this issue, this 12-page piece riffs off of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Raven," featuring a Poe scholar named Eddie Powe and a silly villain called, well, the Raven. For 16 years, Joey Makk has nursed a grudge against Powe for showing "me up before my gang" and not letting him steal his family's rent money using a trained bird. Makk, now a costumed villain—"Now to put on this raven outfit I use to conceal my identify rom the gang I've gathered around me—so they can never betray me."—has given Powe a trained bird as a gift... and to eavesdrop on his activities.

Once Makk learns that Powe possesses a heretofore undiscovered Poe manuscript, he plans to steal it. Hawkman intervenes, and Makk embarrasses Powe on television, discrediting him as a scholar. Makk tries to sell the manuscript to a fence, but Hawkman—with the help of Makk's trained bird, oddly—intervenes again. The Poe theme is slightly off putting, but if it turned on at least one reader to check out Poe in 1966, more power to Fox. Anderson's artwork is able and workmanlike.



"Enigma of the Escape-Happy Jewel Thieves" Story: Gardner Fox, Art: Murphy Anderson.
Another 12 pager, this story features Hawkman and Hawkgirl's encounter with four thieves who seem particularly adept at eluding capture. In the end, it's as simple as hired decoys: "We're members of the City Cycle Club. Some man paid us ten bucks each to race to the Mumford Art Gallery—go in the doorway—then after a while race out and speed off in four different directions!"

The gang plans to kill Hawkman and Hawkgirl, but a jeweled pistol dropped by our heroes—and picked up by the villains—on p. 2 leads our crimefighters to the criminals. This series of crimes seems a little down market for a prince of Thanagar, but who can say. The issue also features a one-page letter column including four letters of comment.

Availability: Both stories were collected in Showcase Presents Hawkman TP Vol 02.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Hit-Monkey

Deadpool #19-21 (Marvel, April-May 2010, $2.99)
"Whatever a Spider Can" Writer: Daniel Way, Penciler: Carlo Barberi, Inkers: Juan Vlasco and Sandu Florea, Colorist: Marte Gracia, Cover artist: Jason Pearson, Letterer: VC's Joe Sabino.

I'm not the biggest fan of Deadpool. I don't find the idea behind the character compelling, I don't often need Impossible Man or Ambush Bug-like comic book slapstick as a reader (although I like both those characters!), and I've avoided much of the character's publication history. Regardless, I sometimes dip into the comic to reaffirm whether my take remains the same. This three-issue Spider-Man crossover is actually worth reading.



It helps that Spider-Man is in the book. It also helps that... Hit-Monkey is in the book. Yes, Hit-Monkey. First appearing in an online comic that was later published in print—and then appearing in these three issues, as well as three-issue miniseries—Hit-Monkey is a little used character that could have longer legs. I hope we see more of him.

The cover to #20 is particularly fun, as is p. 14, and pp. 19-22 of that issue. In #21, p. 13 is wonderful. Way's writing is fun and light throughout, focusing primarily on gastrointestinal humor. "Why are you so sad?"



Read Also: Amazing Spider-Man #611 and Deadpool #10.

Availability: These issues were collected in Deadpool, Vol. 4: Monkey Business. We also recommend Hit-Monkey.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Monday, May 21, 2018

Puritan Pistolier

Solomon Kane: Red Shadows #1-2 (Dark Horse, April-May 2011, $3.50)
"Skulls in the Stars" Script: Bruce Jones, Artist: Rahsan Ekedal, Color artist: Dan Jackson, Letterer: Richard Starkings and Comicraft, Cover artist: Guy Davis, Cover colors: Dave Stewart.

Based on the work of Robert E. Howard, these comics—whole numbers 10-11 in a series, and the first two parts of "Red Shadows"—adapt the short story "Skulls in the Stars," which was originally published in Weird Tales in January 1929. In #1, Solomon Kane is on his way to Torkertown, when he comes to a fork in the road. One path leads through the moors, and the other meanders along a longer route.



Locals avoid the shorter, more direct path because of "certain death by night" and "something unspeakable." Of course, the Puritan pistolier Kane takes the less-traveled route, encountering "some hellish figure" that flees when provoked by mentions of God and heaven—and presented with the shadow of a cross. A young boy helps Kane to the hut of a miserly hermit named Ezra, who conspires to steal his gold necklace.

In #2, Kane vows to track down Le Loup, a bandit and rapist. This issue is based on the story "Red Shadows," first published in Weird Tales in August 1928—the first Solomon Kane story. Le Loup almost escapes.



Truth be told, these comics are worth getting for the Guy Davis covers alone—wonderful images, and suggestive that he'd be a good fit as penciler generally. As it is, Ekedal's artwork is fine, with #1 including several solid pictures of the three-skulled wraith in the moor and a wonderful p. 20. #2's p. 5 and 19 also resonate, but the artwork is a little too cartoony-realistic for what could be a darkly dense and brooding noir fantasy... closer to Howard's original writing.

Availability: These two issues were collected in Solomon Kane Volume 3: Red Shadows. We also recommend The Savage Tales of Solomon Kane, which highlights Howard's original short stories.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Friday, May 18, 2018

A Multi-Team X-Book?

Cyberforce #2 (Image, March 1993, $1.95)
"The Tin Men of War, Part Two": Pencils/inks: Marc Silvestri, Script: Eric Serge Silvestri, Colors: Joe Chiodo, Letters: Mike Heisler, Color Separator: Olyoptics, Editor: Cynthia Sullivan.

Bounty hunters (including Ballistic and Killjoy) threaten Velocity's wellbeing just before Cyberforce arrives to rescue her, and the two groups clash. During the combat, Stryker finds two lost children, Chip and Timmie. There are a couple of false endings to the battle—Stryker getting the drop on Ballistic, then Megawatt on Stryker, and then Heatwave snatching Velocity—but in the end, Cyberforce is not defeated.



They decide to relocate Cyber-Tek's Advanced Robotics Division given the attack, and readers—who perhaps haven't read #1—learn that Timmie is an android. "A truly intelligent machine like Timmie couldn't function without [feelings]." Meanwhile, having obtained two small computer disks, Splitzkrieg, Wyldfyre, and Slam pretty much bump into Velocity and Timmie at the grocery store—deciding to kidnap them. "You never know when we might need some hostages."

Not having read #1, this issue is mostly an exercise in learning the characters for me. Who are these people? What the heck are they doing? Having come off of Wolverine to join Image, Silvestri's art is very similar to what one might expect from an X-Men book, and the series largely feels like a multi-team X-book. At least so far. Silvestri's art does please with several one- to three-panel pages and two-page spreads, and it's neat to see so many large-scale panels.

Notable and worth reading because of Image's history and evolution over time. There's also a four-page letter column that features fan art. They even offer fan art guidelines to encourage submissions: "We can only consider Cyberforce characters in black and white for publication. Please do not send originals unless you do not want them back! Good photocopies are OK!"

Availability: This issue was collected in Cyberforce: The Tin Men of War.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Demonic Dimensions

The Darkness: First Look (Top Cow, November 2007, 99 cents)
"Empire, Part One: Nightfall" Writer: Phil Hester, Penciler: Michael Broussard, Inker: Ryan Winn, Colorist: Matt Milla, Letters: Troy Peteri, Design: Chaz Riggs, Editor: Rob Levin.

This 16-page inexpensive comic is a preview of the 2008 Top Cow/Image series featuring the character created by Marc Silvestri, Garth Ennis, and David Wohl. Mafia hitman Jackie Estacado becomes possessed by the Darkness, an elemental force that can bridge to demonic dimensions. Dating back to the Christian creation story, the Darkness has existed since there was light, resenting it and "looking for purchase in the hearts of men" throughout history.



Estacado finds himself in Sierra Munoz, entertaining "a little friendly company"—though reluctant—over dinner before his waiter explodes and the Darkness is yet again called on. Broussard's artwork is standard early Image fare even 15 years in, reminding me of Rob Liefeld and Marc Silvestri. There's a fun Solomon Kane-like character in pp. 2-3's spread, and the hand holding on p. 8 reminds me a little of Tim Vigil. But I don't really find the character concept compelling.



I find characters like this strange. The title must have sold because it lasted for awhile, and artists and writers other than the creators took on the work for subsequent series. But did the Darkness really warrant so many Marvel and DC crossovers, and a video game? I don't get it.

Availability: This one shot is collected in The Darkness Accursed Volume 1. The character debuted about a decade prior, now collected in The Darkness: Coming of Age, Vol. 1.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Trial By Fire

Daredevil #511 (Marvel, December 2010, $2.99)
Writer: Andy Diggle, Art: Roberto De La Torre, Colors: Matt Hollingsworth, Letters: VC's Joe Caramagna, Cover Art: John Cassaday and Laura Martin.

Published during the fourth month of the Shadowland storyline, the story arc was already well underway, so this issue is kind of a trial by fire. In Hell's Kitchen, the Hand has withdrawn to their castle, and citizens are rioting. Mayor Jonah Jameson sends in the riot police as Dakota North, private investigator ("One side, jackholes!"), looks for Foggy Nelson in the crowd. She meets up with NYPD Detective Alex Kurtz, and they discuss what's been happening in the city—helpful exposition—before North remembers a friend needing help.



Wheelchair-bound Becky tries to get out of a building filling with gas fumes while Nelson bravely scales the walls and roof of the castle to save his friend Matt Murdock. North rescues Becky, but Nelson encounters the White Tiger (p. 19, last panel, meow!), who takes him before what seems to be a possessed Daredevil.

Despite its island in the stream nature as a standalone read, the issue is a fun read. De La Torre's art is grittily realistic and adequately dark for the subject matter, and the action passable without the longer story arc.



According to a U.S. Postal Service Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation in this issue, Marvel printed about 46,000 copies of each monthly issue of Daredevil in the 12 months leading up to Sept. 30, 2010.

Availability: This issue has been collected in Daredevil: Shadowland Omnibus and the trade paperback Daredevil: Shadowland. We also recommend the original Dakota North: Design for Dying miniseries.

This issue comes from the Henry's Green Cape collection of comics. Thank you for your donation!

Friday, March 16, 2018

Slices of Daily Life

You Don't Get There from Here #31-33, #35-36 (November 2013 to July 2014 and October 2014 to March 2015, self-published, $3)
This is one of my favorite minicomics. Written and drawn by Los Angeles-area artist, hiker, and cat lover Carrie McNinch, these digest-sized comics collect her daily one- to five-panel diary comics. We ordered these from John Porcellino at Spit and a Half, and after I read them—as did my wife and son—my wife ordered even more. Since then, I've ordered still more and subscribed directly from Carrie. It's been awhile since I've kept up with her work, having let a previous subscription lapse.

Drawn daily, dated, and indicating part of her daily soundtrack (from Kanye West's "Monster" to Broken Bells's "Holding on to Life" in #31 alone), the comics are pleasant slices of Carrie's life. Like many autobiographical and semi-autobiographical minicomics, it's not always clear where the line between artful narrator and actual person is drawn, but Carrie comes across as very kind and personable in her comics. She is also very open about what concerns her.



Consistent themes running throughout her work include anxiety over her living situation; running, hiking, and walking dogs in the mountains north of LA; hanging out with friends and babysitting; aging, approaching menopause, and health insurance; occasional depression; her father; food and restaurants she frequents; drinking too much; the beauty of nature; the LA Zine Fest; her cats Milo and Chu; acupuncture; Disneyland; and travels to Mexico and Japan.

Her drawing style is simply detailed—at times similar to Porcellino's work—and some of her most impressive panel work depicts either landscapes or cityscapes; or more metaphorical imagery such as disembodied or drunk uncertainty (for example, 12/11/13), the specter of anxiety (2/3/14), and loneliness and the need for physical contact (4/3/14).

Her daily diary comics are occasionally joined by longer-form journalistic pieces about her travels to Mexico and her father, who had Alzheimer's; showing that her comics storytelling isn't limited to several-panel slices of daily life.

Regardless of whether you like minicomics, personal comics, Los Angeles, cats, or any of the other topics mentioned above, check out Carrie's comics. Reading one issue is rewarding, but reading more shares a broader perspective on her life and personal development over that time. Personally, I want to go hiking with her!

Availability: You can order copies from Carrie McNinch, P.O. Box 49403, Los Angeles, CA 90049 or online. Her graphic novel I Want Everything To Be Okay is also available.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Without His Powers

The Flash #40 (DC, April 2018, $2.99)
The issue opens with a bang, as Grodd and Raijin try to control the Flash—Grodd dying of the Silence and seeking to "draw forth the Speed Force and save my life." Meanwhile, Central City is trapped in an energy field, its own speed also being drained. The Flash attempts to persuade Grodd to stop. "I promise we'll find you a cure." Kid Flash disarms Raijin, and Avery grabs the lightning wand.

Grodd probes the Flash's mind further, believing that without his powers, the Flash would be nothing. Grodd's helpers, including Meena—Negative Flash—strap the Flash to a machine, transferring the power to Grodd, leaving our speedy hero powerless as Barry Allen—and leading Grodd to realize that even his Speed Force isn't enough.



Wally West saves Allen from a major fall and—with little upset or self-pity—is named by Allen the new Flash of Central City by Allen.

To a reader who hasn't been keeping up with Joshua Williamson's current storyline, this issue feels a little hellbent and linear, and the loss of Allen's powers underemphasized... or at least causing little reaction or concern. Losing the Speed Force should be a bigger deal, perhaps. Regardless, my son loves this comic—and I do enjoy Grodd—so it was an interesting read. We'll have to see what came before... and what happens next!

Read Also: The Flash Annual #1.

Availability: You can buy this issue online. #28-32 have been collected in The Flash Vol. 5: Negative.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Drawn from the Cosmic Log

Secrets of Haunted House #31 (DC, December 1980, 50 cents)
Mr. E serves on the faculty of Mystik U, and I had never read about the character before, so I pulled out some back issues of this horror anthology title. It's an interesting read. For one, 1980 is pretty late for a horror comic published by one of the majors. And two, Mr. E might—or might not—be an interesting character. (I'm not sure yet whether he was worth reviving.)

The comic opens with a one-page bookend featuring a host of sorts, Destiny, who suggests that the stories within are drawn from the Cosmic Log, which documents the fates and destinies of mankind.



"The Short-Road to Damnation" Story: Arnold Drake, Art: Tenny Henson.

In this seven-page story—opened and closed by the cloaked Destiny—a diminutive French businessman makes off with boots worn by Napoleon from a museum. Wearing the boots gives him new bravery and daring, allowing him to succeed more in work and life. They also drive him to madness and violence, resulting in a couple of deaths. A police inspector suspects him.

Henson's art is stylish, reminding me of fashion advertising clip art, which lends an interesting formality to the story.

"The Wish"

A one-page gag by Dave Manak, this suggests that you should be careful what you wish for, especially if you're a fisherman.



"The Morbidity Factor!" Story: George Kashdan, Pencils: J.J. Brozowski, Inks: Kim DeMulder, Letters: Shel Leferman, Editor: Jack C. Harris.

Sam Harker is in flight from the law, when he comes upon a hiding place, an occupied house—and perhaps a hostage. Dr. Walter Trent, professor of biochemistry, has developed an antidote to the Death Factor, a unique chemical catalyst that can prolong a living being's life. Despite a warning from Destiny itself, Harker downs the doctor and drinks the antidote... before being arrested.

Now immortal, Harker doesn't fall to gunshots. He doesn't die, electrocuted. In fact, he lives into "the far-distant future," suggesting that immortality might not be all it's cracked up to be.

"The Twice-Cursed Man!" Writer/Creator: Bon Rozakis, Artist: Dan Spiegle, Letterer: Ben Oda, Colorist: Bob LeRose, Editor/Co-Creator: Jack C. Harris.

Irish immigrant Kelly O'Toole bumps into Destiny upon arriving in Boston before meeting an injured or ill man, Judge Kobold, who soon hires her as a housekeeper. Mr. E—in his first appearance—is investigating a series of bizarre murders, taking him to Kobold's home. Though blind, Mr. E is about to drive a wooden stake into Kobold's chest when O'Toole hits him in the head with a gavel.

Turns out Kobold is a vampire. She succeeds in stopping Kobold from killing Mr. E, but despite the vampire's injuries, he escapes. O'Toole tends to Mr. E.

Unfortunately, we don't learn a lot about Mr. E in this first appearance. Why is he blind? How does he know so much? How did he track Kobold to his home? Perhaps future issues will tell. For now, he remains a mystery.

The issue closes with a one-page letter column, "The Haunted Mailbox."

Availability: This issue has not been reprinted. We recommend Haunted Horror: The Screaming Skulls! and Much More and The Weird World of Eerie Publications: Comic Gore That Warped Millions of Young Minds.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

The Thick of the Action

John Carter, Warlord of Mars #1 (Marvel, June 1977, 30 cents)
"The Air-Pirates of Mars Chapter 1" Writer/Editor: Marv Wolfman, Artists: Gil Kane and Dave Cockrum, Letterer: Joe Rosen, Colorist: Glynis Wein.

This is not a mere adaptation of a novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, also creator of Tarzan. Instead, according to the two-page text piece "Welcome Back, Carter," the creators found an empty spot in the existing narrative—a nine-year gap between paragraphs three and four in chapter 27 of A Princess of Mars (!!!)—and proceeded to fill it with their own stories. That is so very cool. Wolfman also writes about how he first became a fan of the character, how the licensed series came to be, and how he connected with Kane during his "halcyon days as a far-out fanzine editor."



While I haven't read A Princess of Mars, I look forward to seeing how this 28-issue series fits in. This issue, the first, starts in the thick of the action, as Carter hunts for Dejah Thoris, kidnaped from her castle in Helium. While fighting several Warhoon desperately using radium bullets, Carter recalls his origin—and how he came to Barsoom. He also remembers how he first met—and fell in love with Thoris—before defeating the Warhoon and reaching the heart of Zodanga, where she is held prisoner.

John Carter, Warlord of Mars #2 (Marvel, July 1977, 30 cents)
"From the Shadows... Stara-Kan!" Writer/Editor: Marv Wolfman, Pencils: Gil Kane, Inks: Rudy Nebres, Letters: John Costanza, Colors: Janice Cohen.



After rescuing Dejah Thoris and his friend Tars Tarkas, Carter sets out to investigate the city of Zodanga. He soon encounters a red man equipped with an equilibri-motor and brings him to ground, then taking him to Helium. The prisoner remains silent on the Pedestal of Truth in the Temple of Reward and soon handily escapes from his cell. "The replacement of my arm with this mechanical one was well worth it." Carter and Tars Tharkas go in search of the escapee but are accosted by the White Apes, who snag Thoris and down our heroes.

This is an excellent adventure series, well written and drawn, and drawn on some of the best source material possible. Well worth exploring!

Availability: These issues were collected in John Carter, Warlord of Mars Omnibus. We also recommend John Carter: Barsoom Series, which compiles all seven John Carter novels.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

A Nostalgic Journey

Fantasy Masterpieces #1 (Marvel, February 1966, 12 cents)
"Beware!! The Ghosts Surround Me!!" Plot: Stan Lee, Script: Larry Lieber, Pencils and inks: Don Heck, Letters: Artie Simek.

Originally published in Strange Tales #76, this six-page story tells the tale of an escaping thief in Transylvania who runs into aliens. They meet "at certain points along the dimensional barrier, [where] our would and yours meet!" The criminal takes cover in an old house and is captured by the police—or is he?



"I Found the Things from Nowhere" Plot: Stan Lee, Script Larry Lieber, Pencils and inks: Jack Kirby, Letters: Artie Simek.

This five-page piece originally appeared in Journey Into Mystery #60. A man watching baseball on TV experiences a technical glitch that accidentally tunes into not a science-fiction program but "something that's really happening!": some kind of alien battle. However, the scene he sees unfolding is not on another planet, but much closer to home than he realizes. Kirby's artwork is excellent, especially the first page and the first panel on p. 4.



"I Became a Human Robot!" Pencils and inks: Joe Sinnott.

A five pager that originally ran in Suspense #5, this story details the risks of implanting your alien brain in a robot's metallic frame. Sure, you'd enjoy the ability to "think and move and use its mechanical abilities" at first. But once you'd avoided "impending disaster," "saved the Earthling," and been deactivated for installation in a museum, what then?



"I Saw the Other World!" Script: Stan Lee, Pencils and inks: Dick Ayers, Letters: Dick Ayers.

Originally from Tales to Astonish #7, this four-page story—the shortest in the issue—focuses on a camera that seems to take pictures of "another dimension that exists side by side with ours!!" The photographer tries to make his case to passersby outside his home, but nobody believes him. Ayers artwork, while not depicting superheroes or action per se is still quite lively and dynamic. P. 3 is particularly strong.



"Those Who Change" Script: Stan Lee, Pencils and inks: Steve Ditko, Letters: Artie Simek.

This five-page story from Amazing Fantasy #10 is a compelling cautionary tale about the danger of time travel. To whit: Don't mess. Ditko's art is stellar, with too many highlights to list, and the punchline at the end is a laugh. A fun piece.

This is a beauty of a reprint book, "taking you on a nostalgic journey to yesterday's fantasy wonderland." The text-heavy introduction featuring Stan Lee on the inside front cover, while "cornball," draws straight lines between the older fantasy stories and then-current Marvel titles such as the Avengers, Fantastic Four, Captain America, Spider-Man, and Dr. Strange.

Availability: "I Found the Things from Nowhere" was reprinted in Monsters Vol. 1: The Marvel Monsterbus. "I Became a Human Robot" appeared in Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Volume 1. "I Saw the Other World!" was collected in Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1. "Those Who Change" ended up in Amazing Fantasy Omnibus.

Friday, February 09, 2018

EC-Like Dynamism

Chamber of Darkness #2 (Marvel, December 1969, 15 cents)
"Forewarned Is Four-Armed!" Editor: Stan Lee, Script: Neal Adams and Roy Thomas, Art: Marie Severin, Inks: Herb Trimpe and Tom Sutton.

Hosted by Headstone P. Gravely, this horror anthology comic has never been collected. The opening seven-page story features the classic "insane man tells his story to the authorities" structure, with an expected—though still fun—twist. There are several art highlights, including the second panel on p. 1, the EC-like dynamism of p. 2's final panel, pp. 4-5 in their entirety, and the hands on the last panel of p. 6.



"The Face of Fear" Story by: Stan Lee, Script by: Archie Goodwin, Art by: Syd Shores, and Lettering by: Jean Izzo.

Long-haired Freddy Garricks sees a creepy face in the mirror while shaving and flees his parents' apartment, only to avoid a disastrous elevator mishap. Will he see the face again? Will he ever shave? Did the vision almost cause the accident, or avert it? Who dares speculate?



"The Day of the Red Death" Editor: Stan Lee, Scripter: Roy Thomas, Artist: Don Heck, Lettered by: Sam Rosen.

Hosted by none other than Smilin' Stan, who name drops Saki, Lovecraft, and Ambrose Bierce, this story updates an Edgar Allen Poe classic. Weaponized poison gas has "devastated the globe," and eight wealthy people—including the arms manufacturer responsible—play cards to determine who will be "king of a newborn planet." Six men vie for the affection of two surviving women until one of the men is overcome by guilt. The ending is fine comeuppance.

The stories are decent enough, and the art is fine—but this anthology comic falls a little flat. Regardless, I'm glad it existed. I wish there were more like it today.

Availability: This series has not been collected. Though dealing primarily with pre-Code horror comics, we recommend the books The Horror! The Horror!: Comic Books the Government Didn't Want You to Read! and Four Color Fear: Forgotten Horror Comics of the 1950s.

In Search of a Phantom Submarine

Capt. Savage and His Leatherneck Raiders #2 (Marvel, March 1968, 12 cents)
"The Return of Baron Strucker!" Edited by: Stan Lee, Written by: Gary Friedrich, Drawn by: Dick Ayers, Inked by: Syd Shores, Lettered by: L.P. Gregory, Was here: Forbush.

This title, a Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos spinoff, lasted 19 issues—and might be one of my favorite comic series discovered in the last year. Friedrich and Ayers also helmed an even-shorter later spinoff, Combat Kelly and the Deadly Dozen, which lasted only nine issues. (I've yet to read that title.)

The issue opens with Capt. Savage watching his fellow marines during a training exercise: grizzled veteran Yaketty Yates, the French-accented and mustachioed Jacques La Rocque, former teacher Lee Baker, Native American wrestler Chief Jay Little Bear, and second in command Blarney Stone. Once done, they go in search of a phantom submarine sinking ships.



A Japanese team of soldiers, the Samurai Squadron, also searches for that mysterious sub, which turns out to be controlled by one Baron Strucker, the Supreme Hydra. As the marines and Japanese encounter a series of traps landing on the beach of a small island—"This place's got more dangers than Dracula's castle!"—Strucker remembers what brought him here. (This issue contains the origin of Hydra.)

Strucker's traps eventually bring the two landing forces face to face, each thinking the other country controls the threatening submarine. They fight for the rest of the issue, punctuated by relatively racist dialogue, before realizing that they share a common enemy in Strucker on the last page of the comic.

Friedrich's writing—though no longer appropriate in terms of racial sensitivity—is natural and smooth. And Ayers art is excellent. He might even be my favorite artist in recent months. I found the pacing and page balance even more impressive, with only two pages featuring more than six panels.

Read Also: Sgt. Fury and His Leatherneck Raiders #29.

Availability: Capt. Savage has not been collected. We recommend Essential Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos.

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Age-Appropriate Adventures

Spidey Super Stories #2 (Marvel, November 1974, 35 cents)
"In the Hands of the Hunter" Writer: Jean Thomas; Artists: Winslow Mortimer, Don Heck, and Mike Esposito; Editor: Roy Thomas; Art Director: John Romita. (13 pages)

Presented by Marvel Comics and The Electric Company, a production of the Children's Television Workshop, this ad-free (!!!) comic book aimed at readers age 6-10 was based on the recurring live-action skit featured on the TV show. It ran 57 issues between 1974 and 1982, living beyond the skit on TV—which ended in 1976-1977.



Written by Jean Thomas, who also wrote Night Nurse, the comic book was thoroughly vetted by the CTW to be sure it was true to the TV show, was age appropriate in terms of content and reading level, and featured female characters. In early issues, a story adapted one of the TV segments, and in many issues, Spider-Man was paired with a well-known Marvel hero or villain to introduce that character to younger readers and viewers. (Similar to the Marvel Heroes and Marvel Ultimate Spider-Man magazines published by Redan today.)

In this issue, Spidey and Jennifer of the Jungle encounter Kraven the Hunter after a film shoot. Kraven takes the web slinger prisoner, and Jennifer—with her friend Paul the Gorilla—go to rescue him. The writing is very simple, and the artwork larger-paneled (most pages with fewer than six panels)—but not quite coloring-book basic.

In the five-page "very short comic book ... as seen on The Electric Company" story "Spidey Vs. Mr. Measles," Spider-Man "meets the meanest menace of all," a man plans to throw spots at people so they get the measles. "Then everybody will have to stay in bed... in the dark, where they can't read!"

"The Long Arms of the Law-Breaker" (12 pages) pits Spidey against Doctor Octopus. The issue also features several one-page items: "The Secrets of Spider-Man's Costume," "Let's Pay a Visit to Peter Parker's Place," "Let's See Some More of Peter Parker's Place," and "Reader Vs. Speeder," which features Electric Company character Easy Reader.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Slowly Unfolding

Yeet Presents #17 (Cost of Paper, February 2018, free)
This issue is even better than #16, which introduced me to this free, self-published comic series. This time featuring two pieces, the edition includes a 23-page Unbreakable Blastwave story by Eli Jansen and Eric Baumgard, and a three-page story by Greta Fantini titled "Acromegaly."

The Blastwave piece, written by Jansen and Baumgard and drawn by Jansen, is an excellent, excellent read—even if the art is a little rough stylistically. It's clear that care and attention went into the production; Jansen uses computer-manipulated photographs as backgrounds sometimes, and the computer lettering helps make it a clean read despite the lack of spaces after punctuation. I am curious how the writing duties were shared, because the writing is quite solid—admittedly surprising for an amateur comic.



It's a mystery. Despite the name of the assumed title character, it's not explicitly a superhero story. There is crime, family drama, adventure, parkour, a crashing spaceship, a demonic figure, and some sort of giant robot or super suit at the end. But for the most part, this is a very human, dialog- and writing-driven story. I appreciate that the creators are slowly unfolding their world, its characters, and narrative.

Following a one-page letter column, "C.O.P. Comments," Fantini contributes a humorous short piece addressing children's response to different body types and self-confidence.



This issue feels more solid and consistent than the previous issue, even if its contributors are similar. A project well worth checking out—and supporting.

Availability: Write Cost of Paper Comics care of Mike Jones, 3257 Kneeland Circle, Howell, MI 48843. Jansen also contributed to Theodore Raymond Riddle's Compu-M.E.C.H. #1. Fantini's Lo Zombi is also available.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Back Issue Boxes

Collectors #1-3 (Collectors Comics, June 2013 to October 2015, $4.99 and $6.99)
Collectors is a weekly Web comic written and drawn by Eddie deAngelini, co-owner of Santa Monica's Hi De Ho Comics with Geoffrey Patterson of Geoffrey's Comics in Gardena. It's the "love story of a husband, a wife, and a comic book collection," loosely based on deAngelini's partnership with his wife Kristen.

These three annual collections, ranging between 44 and 68 pages, and seemingly funded by Kickstarter campaigns, collect material published online, as well as new material to frame and punctuate the reprints, candid photographs of cosplay and comics from deAngelini's collection, and letters of comment from readers.



Strips address thematic constants and concerns of comic book readers and collectors: trivial knowledge about first appearances, anxiety over how much comics cost, holy grail issues of desire, the frustrations of online auctions, the joy of flipping through back issue boxes, and a rich fantasy life. deAngelini also addresses common marriage challenges: family budgets, travel to conventions, spousal compromises, and shared interests such as zombies and cosplay.

The writing is brisk and to the point, gently loving, and clever—and deAngelini clearly loves comic books, reading and collecting. deAngelini's artwork is simple and basic but does the trick—and has matured a little over time. His drawings of Marvel heroes remind me slightly of Fred Hembeck and Chris Giarrusso.

Availability: You can buy Collectors online.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Trek-Citement

Star Trek: Discovery—The Light of Kahless #2 (IDW, November 2017, $3.99)
Having recently caught up on Star Trek: Discovery episodes I have been in a state of Trek-citement. Reading the media tie-in novel Star Trek: Discovery: Desperate Hours has helped satisfy that yen, as did the second issue of this tie-in comic.

Written by Kirsten Beyer and Mike Johnson, and drawn by Tony Shasteen, it's an excellent read—and one that will help fill in some back story for those watching the show. At the same time, it's a good standalone story, featuring interesting characterization and wonderful science-fiction artwork.



This issue tells the story of the Klingon T'Kuvma's spiritual awakening and allegiance to Kahless, as told to Voq. Studying in the harsh environs of the Cauldron of Tak'la Pokh in the Caves of Nomat on Boreth, T'Kuvma sees a vision. The vision returns during "the worst storm in years," the Rage of Pakath.

T'Kuvma returns home to House Girjah against his wishes, to assist his sister J'Ula, expected to wed into House Mokai. There, she shows him the flagship the "common people" have restored, as well as its invisibility shield. Then, T'Kuvma meets J'Ula's betrothed, D'Lor of House Mokai.



If you enjoy Star Trek or the Klingons generally—and if you enjoy the new show specifically—check out this comic. The writing is true to the mythos, and Shasteen's artwork is wonderful. I was particularly impressed by the spread on pp. 2-3 of the Cauldron and the flagship interiors on pp. 14-15.

Availability: A collection of the series will be published in July. We also recommend the tie-in novel Star Trek: Discovery: Desperate Hours.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Merely Doom's Puppet

Super-Villain Team-Up #3 (Marvel, December 1975, 25 cents)
"If Vengeance Fails!" Writer: Jim Shooter, Artist: George Evans, Inker: Jack Abel, Letterer: Ray Holloway, Colorist: Ellen Vartanoff, Editor: Marv Wolfman.

While I understand that Prince Namor, the Savage Sub-Mariner, is an antihero and occasional foil for other Marvel heroes, I can't quite buy that he is a super-villain, per se. So a book featuring super villains—and starring Namor—seems a bit strange to me. As does a team-up book pairing him with Dr. Doom, who is definitely a super-villain. So I'm curious about the business reasons inspiring this book—because the creative inspiration isn't entirely clear. The series lasted 17 issues.



After killing Billy Dean, Namor's lover, Dr. Dorca becomes the object of the Sub-Mariner's ire. Tiger Shark and Attuma attack Namor in turn before Dr. Doom arrives. Doom downs the trio of foes ("I... had forgotten! You seek to ally yourself to the Prince of Atlantis!") and the two retreat to Doom's amphibious skycraft—and then Castle Latveria—to regroup. Healed and refreshed by a chemical brine-bath, Namor discusses an attack on Hydrobase with Doom.

They attack, and the Sub-Mariner frees the hostage amphibians before tracking down Tamara, who was being questioned. The battle is hard fought, and p. 26 is quite impressive. Evans's artwork is decent enough, but it is Abel's inks that make the issue worthwhile visually. The issue also includes a one-page letter column, "Bad Tidings."

Read Also: Super-Villain Team-Up #2.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Cataloging Comics Ephemera

Minis, Digests, Etc. #1-8 (Tanreth Press, April 2016 to December 2017, $4)
This infrequently but consistently published "iterative reference guide" edited and published by Scott Davis picks up where The Official Underground and Newave Comix Price Guide and Fogel's Underground Price & Grading Guide leave off, bringing those two resources closer to review zines such as D. Blake Werts's Copy This! to catalog and document mini-comics and other comics ephemera. Each 32-page edition, limited to a first print run of 25, indexes mini-comics, digest-sized comics, and comics of other shapes and sizes—including material from the United Fanzine Organization and Small Press Syndicate. The first eight issues go up through D, to Brad Foster's The Dirty Old Lady Digest, which ran five issues between 1986 and 1993.



This zine might not be of interest to everybody—but it is an amazing and impressive project. If you've read mini-comics over the years, it'll be a fun read. And it's a crucial tool for zine and comics librarians, archivists, collectors, and scholars. Davis indexes titles, issue numbers, dates, contributors, price, and additional information for each item. The neatest part of the index zine, however, might be the reduced cover art at the foot of many pages. Just flipping through a few issues, some of the cover art highlights include Adventures of A-Girl, Amazing Cynicalman, Andy Nukes's BLDGS., Jeff Zenick's Destined, Max Traffic's Diary of Neo-Psychedelic Man, and others.



This zine is a labor of love that is much appreciated. I look forward to future issues!

Availability: Write Scott Davis at 114 Lesnyk Road, Goffstown, NH 03045, or email him. You can also order it from the Poopsheet Foundation.

Monday, January 22, 2018

1,000 Superheroes and Other-Dimensional Pets

House of Mystery #157 (DC, March 1966, 12 cents)
"The Marauders of Thunderbolt Island" Script: Dave Wood, Pencils and Inks: Jim Mooney, Letters: Stan Starkman.

In Dial H for Hero stories teenager Robby Reed ("Sockamagee!") turns the mysterious H-Dial to spell out H-E-R-O, becoming any one of 1,000 superheroes. In this issue, he becomes Super-Charge, the Human Bullet, and Radar-Sonar Man to combat a criminal syndicate led by Mr. Thunder.

After being defeated by Cometeer, Giantboy, and the Mole in the previous issue, the gang steals the experimental Cosmic Computer from a naval freighter. Luckily, attentive teen Reed collected articles on the computer in his scrapbook and is able to guess the syndicate's next target: the New Gibraltar underground repository.



As the Human Bullet, Reed flies to the repository and digs deep into the ground to stop the theft. Cracking a code found at the scene of the attempted crime, he turns into Super-Charge, "a fantastic mass of some kind, radiating a strange energy" strong enough to melt the iron support beams of a bridge. Before he can stop another crime, Super-Charge is imprisoned by a magneto ray, so he reverts to the form of Reed.

The teenage boy escapes from the submersible island fortress by crawling through the HVAC system, then turns into Radar-Sonar Man, who's finally able to scuttle Thunderbolt's operations. I'm not sure I understand the appeal of Dial H for Hero. It seems to have the never-ending variety of the Legion of Super-Heroes, only limited by the teenage alter ego of Reed. Could the 1,000 heroes survive or be active independently? The idea doesn't really work as a tryout book, because if a sub-hero proved popular, it still needs Reed and the dial. What a strange concept!

"Manhunter, World's Greatest Clown" Script: Jack Miller, Pencils and Inks: Joe Certa.

J'onn J'onzz, Manhunter from Mars, stars in a backup story in which he goes up against Professor Hugo, who uses a thought-control machine to manipulate the Manhunter in an attempt to make him a laughing stock. Hugo—disguised as a circus clown—makes Manhunter "execute an intricate dance step," flip giant balls into the air, get stuck in a brick wall, and smash an underground high-pressure water pipe.



But the plan backfires, and audiences are soon laughing with J'onzz, not laughing at him. So Hugo sends Manhunter to rob the Centerville Bank to "destroy his reputation for good." The hero's "other-dimensional pet," Zook destroys the thought-control machine, and Hugo's humiliating crime spree is soon ended.

As much as Dial H for Hero threw me, this Manhunter story also threw me. Why does he have the pet Zook? What is Zook's story? The alien creature played a narrative role and might have appealed to younger readers, but he is a silly, strange sidekick for what could otherwise be a relatively serious hero—who doesn't seem to require such a sidekick.

The issue also included a one-page text piece "Mysteries of the Ages," and a Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation that included no circulation data.

Read Also: House of Mystery #156.

Friday, January 19, 2018

Adventure Comics

Adventure Comics #378 (DC, March 1969, 12 cents)
"Twelve Hours to Live!" Script: Jim Shooter, Layouts: Jim Shooter, Pencils: Win Mortimer, Inks: Jack Abel, Letters: Joe Letterese, Editor: Mort Weisinger.

A tale of the Legion of Super-Heroes, this comic book features Superboy and other members of the LSH. It is Brainiac 5's birthday, and because of some undetected poison—Rakurga—Karate Kid, Superboy, Duo Damsel, Princess Projectra, and Brainiac 5 himself have only 12 hours to live.



They spend their remaining time in different ways. Brianiac uses his twelfth-level brain to find an antidote. Superboy visits Smallville before saving a Martian city from a glacier, rescuing a Space Roc, and otherwise "devoting even the last hours of his life to the good of the galaxy!" Duo Damsel second guesses the value of her powers and spends time with her mother and father in the suburbs. Karate Kid goes on a suicide mission against the Fatal Five—a team of villains worth revisiting, perhaps. Pp. 11-17 are pretty incredible.

Princess Projectra moons over Karate Kid before going to a senso-theater. In Metro Square Park, she meets Myron Marks, park-bench philosopher, who shows her how to face death calmly. The group reconvenes to write their will on a steel tablet, bequeathing various items to the Legion before sinking into comas. The issue also features a one-page letter column, "The Letter Outpost," which features correspondence as prose rather than as discrete letters.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Brave Cavemen and Circus Clowns

World's Finest Comics #138 (DC, December 1963, 12 cents)
World's Finest wasn't always a Superman-Batman team up book, but at this stage in its history, it was—but hadn't yet turned into primarily a Superman book. As represented by the cover alone, this issue is pretty goofy. The cover, drawn by Dick Dillin and inked by Sheldon Moldoff, shows Batman, Robin, and Superman, bearded, clothing torn, and bearing caveman weapons, as frog-like aliens train zap guns on them.

"The Secret of the Captive Cavemen" Script: Bill Finger, Art: Jim Mooney. (15 pages)
An alien being discovers that its Z-beam doesn't work on Earthlings, so it goes to the public library to learn why. "The modern Earthling is not affected, so you must go into the past!" The heroes use the time-machine of their friend Professor Nichols after alerting Superman. "50,000 years in the past," Batman and Robin encounter a woolly rhinoceros before befriending some brave cavemen after Superman's arrival.



To trick the aliens, the superheroes tear their costumes and glue hairs cut from animal hides to their faces so they look more caveman-like. The aliens' Z-beam "robs the mind of will power" when used against cavemen, so the heroes act like they're under the aliens' control. They learn that the cavemen are being forced to mine drakkium from a quarry as slaves because unrefined drakkium is deadly to the aliens. The aliens also plan to take over the modern-day Earth by bombarding it with refined drakkium, which is harmful to humans. The aliens do not succeed.

"Little Pete" Written and drawn: Henry Boltinoff. (One-half page)
Pete hits a home run and breaks up the ball game because he broke Mrs. Brown's window.

"The Secret Face of Funny-Arrow" Script: Ed Herron, Art: Lee Elias. (10 pages)
The Green Arrow goes up against a criminal who either is or is not Funny-Arrow, a performing circus clown. Of the two stories in this issue, this is the more interesting, and Elias's artwork is excellent. Funny-Arrow's presence at the scenes of crimes is suspicious, and the character is just comic enough to not be obviously criminal.



"Peter Puptent" Written and drawn: Henry Boltinoff. (One page)
The explorer meets a business man while on safari.

The issue also includes a one-page text piece, "Build Your Own Universe," which focuses on astronomy-related models and hobbies.

Availability: The Superman, Batman and Robin story has been collected in Showcase Presents World's Finest Vol. 2. The Green Arrow piece was collected in Showcase Presents: Green Arrow, Vol. 1.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Gone Undercover

Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys: The Big Lie #4 and 6 (Dynamite, 2017, $3.99)

Even if you don't know or like Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys, this is a wonderful, straight-ahead mystery comic. It reminds me of Ms. Tree, Criminal, and 100 Bullets. It also reminds me a little of the Riverdale TV show and perhaps even Veronica Mars.



From these two issues, written by Anthony Del Col and drawn by Werther Dell'Edera, I gather that Fenton Hardy supposedly committed suicide (!!!). Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys have gone undercover with a local gang, immersing themselves in Bayport's criminal underground to find the true killer.

Dell'Edera's art is semi-realistic and captures the noir of mystery well, but is cartoony enough to not become overly threatening. Of the youth detective characters, Drew is more of a strong presence than either Hardy, which struck me as odd but good. #4 includes some pretty neat elements, including the statue of General Jack Smith being a literal entry point to the criminal underground.

The return to the caves and "our old adventures" in #6 is a pleasant almost-callback to the original books—and the shadowy art on pp. 12-14 is pretty darn cool. P. 14 is almost all shape and silhouette—a technique that intrigues me.

A sleeper hit! The comic doesn't need the licensed characters. Perhaps the licensed characters need the comic.

Availability: These issues are available in Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys: The Big Lie.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

A Tough Pill

The Divided States of Hysteria #6 (Image, November 2017, $3.99)
Written and drawn by Howard Chaykin, this series follows up his relatively straight-forward noir comic Midnight of the Soul. While the first few issues of this new work felt slightly dense, busy, and difficult to parse, by this point in the series, the multi-layered story—though complex—is easier to read. Perhaps the reader becomes more literate in the comic's form and function with each successive issue.



It is a difficult comic structurally. Chaykin incorporates narrative elements not common to most comics today: little tweet icons and other social media discourse buttons and bugs, photorealistic panel design and elements, and a preponderance of sound effects. The end result is dense, cluttered, but meaningful pages and panels—and a comment of sorts on the age's overwhelming media soup surrounding us. How does one get signal through all the noise?

It is also a difficult comic thematically. It is not a nice, kind, or friendly comic. That doesn't mean it's a hateful comic, but it's not a considerate or patient comic. By this issue, if you made it this far, that might seem OK. But Chaykin pulls no punches on shedding light on some of the more problematic aspects of race, gender, sex, and  class relations and divisions in America today. "The freedoms this nation once promised to any and all... the rights once offered to a free people in a free country... have been supplanted and perverted by a national narcissism... redefining our rights as whatever we may feel like doing at any given moment."

Regardless of your politics, it's a tough pill to stomach, but medicine (more inoculation than curative) worth seeking. An impressive, challenging, important comic that's also fun to read. This issue also includes editorial comments by Chaykin in a column titled "Undivided Attention."

Availability: Divided States of Hysteria will be collected mid-month. You can also buy individual issues online.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Ragman's Rags

Ragman #3 (DC, February 2018, $2.99)
Chapter three of this new series written by Ray Fawkes and drawn by Inaki Miranda progresses the story in three important ways. First of all, Ragman encounters Batwoman, who tells him that other heroes in the city are watching him, that he's not alone. "Anyone who says he's got eyes on us in this mess is lying, sir."



Secondly, Rory's fellow Marine, Jim Fanshawe, emerges as a villain. Left limbless by a bomb while serving overseas, he is visited by a mysterious figure and turned into a force to be reckoned with. "His flesh is toxic, the ooze infernal." And third, a damaged summoning circle in an abandoned theater doesn't summon the expected invading lord Z'Dargill, but Etrigan, the Demon, who helps turn the tide. (The Demon also currently has his own series; does Ragman cross over to its pages?)

I haven't read the preceding series, but this new outing seems to have more in common with the '90s titles than the original 1976 series. Interestingly, Elaine Lee wrote the 1993 miniseries Cry of the Dead. More could be done artistically with Ragman's rags, but the art is enjoyable, particularly those pages portraying Fanshawe.

Availability: You can buy this issue online. This series will be collected in July.

Friday, January 12, 2018

To Topple the Kingpin

The Punisher Magazine #11-12 (Marvel, June-July 1990, $2.25)
I don't understand why they published The Punisher Magazine. I always thought the reason to go magazine format was to bypass restrictions from the Comics Code Authority, to do things you couldn't do in a comic book. You also benefit from a larger page size and the rich moodiness enabled by black and white on newsprint—perfect for horror and adventure.

As Marvel's answer to Mack Bolan, the Punisher seemed ripe for a more mature newsstand magazine, like the mid-'80s Savage Tales. But this wasn't it. Instead, the magazine reprinted issues of the comic book (these two issue reprint #15-18). That's fine—the comic's not bad—but colored artwork isn't always well suited for black-and-white reproduction, and Portacio's art is a little hash-marky for B&W.



#11: "To Topple the Kingpin" Script: Mike Baron, Layout: Whilce Portacio, Finishes: Scott Williams, Letters: Ken Bruzenak, Editor: Carl Potts, Under a Heavy Load: Tom DeFalco.

The Punisher goes after the Kingpin after routing a youth gang in a high school. Building his own Able Team, he enlists the help of Microchip ("Buckminster Fuller's my idol."), a high school student, a chemistry teacher, and too-fleeting love interest Conchita Ortiz. Meanwhile, the Kingpin brings in the specialist Mr. Kliegg.

"Escalation" Script: Mike Baron, Layout: Whilce Portacio, Finished Art: Scott Williams, Letters: Ken Bruzenak, Editor: Carl Potts, Editor with Ammo: Tom DeFalco.

Kliegg is quickly defeated, so the Kingpin turns to a high-school computer hacker, the Board, who discovers the computer bug planted by Microchip. The team takes their fight to the King's Inn, a hotel in which the Kingpin has momentarily moved his operations. "The Kingpin's got some kind of battle bus!"

The issue also includes a one-page pin up by Dan Reed, and a letter column, "Shoot Your Mouth Off!"

Read Also: The Punisher Magazine #6, 9, and 10. (Unless the issue reference captions went un-edited from the original comics, in which case, read also The Punisher #6, 9, and 10.)

DC's Hogwarts

Mystik U #1 (DC, January 2018, $5.99)
Inspired by a recent Zatanna appearance in Detective Comics #959,  I picked this up—and it might be the most fun comic I've read in awhile. Imagine, if you will, if Harry Potter existed in the DC universe. He'd go to Mystik University, natch, and Mystik U is DC's Hogwarts. The series—written by Alisa Kwitney and drawn by Mike Norton—takes place seven years pre-Malevolence, which smacks of the name of a big comic event, but I'm not aware of a Malevolence. Regardless, it doesn't sound good and is clearly worth avoiding.



A current-day Zatanna is sent into the past by Rose to "weave us a different beginning." There, she is sent to Mystik U after accidentally sending her father to hell while on stage. "You've just come into your power." At the school, she meets several new friends, including Sebastian Faust, Pia, Davit, and June Moone, the Enchantress. She also meets members of the university's staff and faculty, including Cain and Abel, a troll named Gerd, Merlin, Baron Winter, and Mr. E.



A "rampaging invertebrate" threatens the campus. It is found to be friendly, but not immediately. Along the way, characters are introduced, students hook up, and the emergence of a larger threat is identified. The comic is very promising. It has an interesting cast, a fascinating setting, and a firm but flexible footing in DC's mystical comics history.

What I think might be most interesting is the tenor and tone. Yes, the comic is grounded in DC's horror lineage: House of Mystery, House of Secrets, the Phantom Stranger, and Secrets of Sinister House. But the comic is anything but dark or heavy. It's light and breezy without being flip or dismissive, not at all dark or heavy—despite its subject matter. There are so many possibilities.

Availability: We recommend Zatanna by Paul Dini and Justice League Dark Vol. 1: In the Dark.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

A Promotional Comic

Raw Data: Ride the Wave (Survios, 2017, free)
The third in a series of seven promotional comic books, this issue focuses on the hero character Boss from the VR first-person shooter video game Raw Data, the first consumer VR game to sell $1 million in a month. It's a 10-page read written by Jonathan Callan and drawn by Darick Robertson.

Boss, a cybernetic mercenary, wakes in a hotel to discover that a reckless kid stole his stuff, including his coat. He gives chase, eventually catching up with the thief. "The fall is inevitable. There's no avoiding that. All you can do is manage the landing."



As a scene setter for a video game, the comic works. This is an effective way to communicate back story and develop characters beyond what might be possible in a VR game, and the comic is classic cyberpunk stuff: William Gibson by way of Shadowrun. There are some friendly in jokes, such as a billboard saying "Drink Emig," name dropping the comic's editor.

The true test of a promotional comic might be this: Does it make you want to try the product or service it promotes? Truth be told, it didn't make me want to play the game. But it did make me want to read the comic. I read this issue twice and will probably read it again. And—if the characters were more fully fleshed out—I could easily see this as an ongoing licensed comic published by Dynamite (publisher of Agent 47), Titan (which puts out Assassin's Creed Origins and Quake Champions), or even Dark Horse (which does Dragon Age comics).

The back matter includes several advertisements for Eden Corp. products.

Availability: The previous issues are available online. We recommend William Gibson's Neuromancer.

Interesting but Not Important

X-Men Blue #15, 17-18 (Marvel, January-February 2018, $3.99)
This is another X-Men comic series that emerged out of Inhumans vs. X-Men. It comprises the original X-Men—Marvel Girl, Cyclops, Angel, Beast, and Iceman—displaced in time and joined by Jimmy Hudson, son of a Wolverine from another universe. Confused yet? It's a fun read, although not the return to the original team I was looking for, and a good example of how complicated and convoluted an X-Men comic can seem if you haven't immersed yourself in the world for awhile.

#15 is the last part of the Mojo Worldwide storyline and was written by Cullen Bunn and drawn by Jorge Molina. Broadcast terrorist Mojo has left the Mojoverse to terraform New York as his new base of operations. Given that this is the last issue, most of the action is behind us, but a lot still happens. Iceman and Magog face off while others on the team get Longshot to the control room to disrupt transmissions. "Take the fight to these broadcast technicians!" The battle with Mojo himself takes a turn with the arrival of Danger, Magneto, and Polaris, but Mojo's defeat isn't complete—opening up a fascinating new opportunity for stories.



This was a great comic to read so soon after the Astonishing X-Men run featuring the Shadow King. Mojo and Farouk have a lot in common! I will have to seek out the preceding issues, as well as other Mojo greatest hits.

#17-18, then pick up in the Cross Time Capers storyline, again written by Bunn and now drawn by R.B. Silva. Because of the paradox that the X-Men Blue team represents, the time stream is crumbling, and the group has been thrown into 2099. There, they meet another X team, which includes Skullfire, Bloodhawk, Cerebra, Metalhead, and Krystalin. (It's awesome to see a writer creating new characters, even if it's in an alternative timeline or universe!)

The team learns that they—in this timeline—took over a company called Alchemax, which led to massive class division and suffering, Sentinel-like killer robots, and perhaps the destruction of Xavier's school, run in this timeline by Banshee and Emma Frost. (Confused yet?) Despite some interesting possibilities, it all feels a little unimportant and unreal given that it's in an alternative time stream. And if the team's very existence is having such deleterious effect on time itself, the group—and this title—might not be long for the world.



This series is kind of a What If? series, only focusing on the X-Men, and with a consistent roster. It's interesting, but perhaps not as important as Astonishing X-Men or X-Men Gold.

Availability: X-Men Blue #1-6 were collected in X-Men Blue Vol. 1: Strangest, and #7-12 are available in X-Men Blue Vol. 2: Toil and Trouble. Otherwise, you can buy the issues online. The Mojo Worldwide storyline will be collected in February in X-Men Gold Vol. 3: Mojo Worldwide. Cross Time Capers will come out as X-Men Blue Vol. 3: Cross-Time Capers in April.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Sound of a Skrull God Dying

Incredible Hercules #120 (Marvel, October 2008, $2.99)
Writers: Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente; Penciler: Rafa Sandoval; Inkers: Roger Bonet and Greg Adams; Colors: Gracia with Calero and Trevino; Letterer: VC's Joe Caramagna; Cover: Romita, Janson, and White; Production: Joe Sabino; Assistant Editor: Nathan Cosby; Editor: Mark Paniccia; Editor in Chief: Joe Quesada; Publisher: Dan Buckley.

New Avengers: Illuminati might have been my first exposure to the Secret Invasion event. This strange Hercules comic book was my second. This title has an odd lineage. It's not so much a Hercules series in the sense that the miniseries published in the '80s were as it is a continuation of a Hulk title—with an ever-shifting name. The title was called at various times Hulk, Incredible Hulk, Incredible Hercules (for almost 30 issues!), and Incredible Hulks.



This issue sports an eye-catching John Romita, Jr., cover. Even though the book showcased Hercules, it was a team book of sorts, featuring the titular hero, Snowbird (of Alpha Flight), Ajak (one of the Eternals), Mikaboshi, Atum, and Amadeus Choi. Up against two Skrull gods, Kly'bn the Eternal Skrull and Sl'gur't of the Infinite Names, the team is floundering.

Snowbird is thought dead, and Ajak wrests the group's leadership from Hercules before attacking Kly'bn. Atum takes on Sl'gur't before dying at her, ahem, hands... before Amadeus himself falls. In the end, Kly'bn falls, but at the expense of many of these characters, some of whom I'd read of for the first time.



Given the awesome subject matter—gods and Skrulls? Lovely.—Pak and Van Lente have plenty of paper to play with. The issue's opening mythological exposition was very interesting, as was the story of Snowbird's return—and the destruction of the Book of Worlds. Ajak's criticism of Hercules is apt, and I'm sure we'll see him again. "Earthbound Eternals have a habit of resurrecting themselves."

Otherwise, it's a fight scene: blood, and bones, and entrails. Sound effects abound. My favorites include "Whakachakaboom!!!", "Shkkraakkkoww," "Qwfoosh!", and "Ga-Bloik!" For that is the sound of a Skrull god dying, impaled on the bone of an elder god.

Availability: This issue was collected in Incredible Hercules, Vol. 2: Secret Invasion. We also recommend Secret Invasion.