Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Comix Index: Rip Off Comix #2

Publisher: Rip Off Press, Inc.
Publication year: 1977 (includes material created between 1974-1977)
Cover price: $1
Purchased: For $8 at Dreamworld Comics

Cover
Wonder Warthog takes a block of stone from the Great Wall of China. Promotional boxes for other material within. (color, art assumed to be by the respective artists)

Interiors are black and white.

Inside cover
Griffith Observatory: "Kids of Today (Tsk, Tsk)" by Bill Griffith
"There's a time and a place for everything -- but for the kids of today (tsk, tsk), the time is always now and the place is always here."

Pp. 1-5
The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers: "Phineas Goes to the Store" by Gilbert Shelton (story by Don Baumgart)
"Wow! My very own head shop!"

Pp. 6-13
Dorman's Doggie By Foolbert Sturgeon
"Live outside! I thought outside was just a big open air potty!"

P. 14
Rowdy Noody By Justin Green
"I'd play a warped record over n' over again, and I wouldn't give the dirty bastid anything 'cept egg water and halvah until he croaked!"

P. 15
Griffith Observatory: "Religious Nuts" by Bill Griffith
"Boss, I can't do no diggin' today -- my chart says my 'air' sign is dominant so I'm goin' to the track!!"

P. 16
Nerds by Dave Sheridan
"Ha! How do we do that? The UFO Society won't even recognize us!"

P. 17
The Forty Year Old Hippie: "The Rip" by Ted Richards
"Sure! Me him! You want buy autograph poem? Me just publish. Fifty dollar money."

P. 18
The Adventures of Fat Freddie's Cat by Gilbert Shelton (two six-panel strips)
"That's a neat stunt, but how do you know that the car will swerve like that?"

P. 19
Griffith Observatory: "The Doomsters" by Bill Griffith
"Your tofu and yeast sandwich is ready... anything in the paper today?"

Pp. 20-24
Terror Under the Bed by R. Diggs
"Get out in that kitchen an' rattle those pots an' pan's!"

Pp. 25-28
The Year Is... 3711 by Dave Sheridan
"We don't know, sir! It just sort of oozed up out of the sewer, sir!" (best panel in the issue)

P. 29
The Forty Year Old Hippie by Ted Richards
"I'm sorry, but I think you've had enough!"
Business name: The Catharsis Coffeehouse

P. 30
The Casebook of Doctor Feelgood by Foolbert Sturgeon
"Things used to be a lot easier for guys like me... you beat up the bad guys and everybody liked you!"

P. 31
Griffith Observatory: "The Geniuses" by Bill Griffith
"An artist, eh? And he rented number nine for the weekend?"

Pp. 32-48
Wonder Warthog: "Epidemic" by Gilbert Shelton
"Just enough to cause a few isolated cases! Our P.R. department will take it from there!"

Inside back cover
Advanced Motoring Tips #149 by Gilbert Shelton
"Radio signals would be sent to change the lights in the vehicle's path. The transmitter would take coins."

Back cover
On a Perfectly Clear Day by Gilbert Shelton (color, house ad)
"If you look long and hard enough, it is said, you can see the back of your own head."

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Travis Millard: Authors@Google

I helped organize this talk by Los Angeles-area comics artist Travis Millard at work in Santa Monica. It took place in February 2010 and just hit YouTube recently.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Dennis Woodruff at the Post Office

Dennis Woodruff is a Hollywood icon of sorts. For the last few decades, he's been making homemade movies about himself and the Hollywood experience -- as well as his search for Hollywood experience. At first they were available on VHS -- I have a thrift store copy of Double Feature -- and now they're on DVD-R.

He sells them out of his art cars, and he'll sell them to you if he meets you on the street. A friend reports that he spends much of his time chatting up pretty girls and overdressed men in Hollywood cafes. Apparently, he also goes to the post office.

Here's what my wife learned about Woodruff while she stood in line ahead of him:

1. He'd like to meet Eddie Murphy.
2. He thinks black men might know Eddie Murphy and isn't too shy to ask them if that's the case. ("Ask for an introduction," he says.)
3. He's impatient. (He said, "If this line doesn't move any faster, I'm going to blow up this place."
4. He writes his URL on his bills when he pays them through the mail.
5. He considers talking to people in public being an entertainer.
6. He doesn't like to waste money on Express Mail and doesn't think you should either.

Ladies and gentlemen, Dennis Woodruff.

Saturday, January 02, 2010

The Greatest Salesman in the World

The first book I read in 2010 was a slim volume, the 111-page 1968 parable written by Og Mandino. I first -- and last -- read the book about eight years ago, near the end of January 2002, on the recommendation of a friend who sold faucets and fixtures for Kohler. I often pick up books on the suggestions of friends. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it doesn't. With Mandino's classic motivational tale The Greatest Salesman in the World, even though I've read it twice, it's a mixed bag.

As a book, pure and simple, it's a quick read. I read it in one sitting yesterday evening before going to bed. It's a clear and clean story about a successful merchant more than 2,000 years ago -- and the lessons he learned that helped him become a success. The major themes are pretty basic Positive Mental Attitude stuff, with a Christian corollary (and Christmas tie-in!) thrown in for good measure. The main thing (though a minor thing) that rubs me the wrong way is the text's focus on business and sales as the vehicle for success. Readers should feel free to replace "salesman" with whatever they're striving to be the best of: father, husband, son, brother, worker, friend.

Mandino, who went on to author other similar books and become a sought-after motivational speaker, overcame a struggle with alcoholism by diving into some of the best PMA writers of the early 20th century: Napoleon Hill, W. Clement Stone, and Emmet Fox. In fact, this book so impressed Stone that he hired Mandino as editor of Success Unlimited magazine. Success Unlimited continues today in the form of Success magazine. You can learn more about Mandino's ideas thanks to Dave Blanchard's work.

Also of potential interest is the book's relationship to other business parables such as Animals Inc., Miller's Bolt, The Radical Edge, Sandbox Wisdom, and Who Moved My Cheese? I'm not the biggest fan of the subgenre, but if you're going to read one, go to the source.

Saturday, November 01, 2008

Taking a Break

It's been a month since my last post, and I've decided that I'm going to take a blogging hiatus of indeterminate length. Rather than blogging, I'll be focusing my energies in participating in several print-based micromedia, including zines, amateur press associations, mail art, and related projects. I might post occasionally, but in general, there will be other places you can find me. If you're really curious what those are, let me know, and I'll point you in the right direction.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Recent Arrivals

It's been a good week-plus for zines and such. Here are some of the highlights:

Comicopia #108 (August 2008): The 18th anniversary issue of this international comics APA. ($6 133M) Savage Enterprises Publishing, 10 rue de la Valline, NDIP, Quebec, Canada J7V 9S5.

Musea #165 (August/September/October 2008): Writing on shared culture, the "art Olympics," and YouTube videos. (8S) Tom Hendricks, 4000 Hawthorne #5, Dallas, TX 75219.

Opuntia 66A (September 2008): Geology, pronghorns, and a literature scan. ($3 16S) Dale Speirs, Box 6830, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2E7.

Rap Sheet #138 (September 2008): The official newsletter of the Small Press Syndicate. ($3 52S) Dale Martin, P.O. Box 442612, Lawrence, KS 66044.

Worry Stone #1: The first issue of Jerianne's new zine about the concerns of adulthood. (28XS) P.O. Box 330156, Murfreesboro, TN 37133.

Zen Baby #19: Christopher Robin's freewheeling zine of correspondence, poetry, news, reviews, and collage art. ($2 56M) P.O. Box 1611, Santa Cruz, CA 95061-1611.

Zine World #26: Perhaps the zine review zine of today. I contribute an article on censorship in California and Russia, as well as assorted zine reviews. ($4 62M) P.O. Box 330156, Murfreesboro, TN 37133.

ZYX #48 (December 2008): Progressive poetry, reviews, and collage art, including poems by A. D. Winans. (10M) Arnold Skemer, 58-09 205th St., Bayside, NY 11364.

Monday, September 15, 2008

Vote for My ChangeThis Manifesto Proposal

I submitted an idea for a ChangeThis manifesto, and it's currently one of the proposals you can vote for. Vote for my proposal, if you think it's a good idea, and help me get selected... I'd love to do this ebook and think it's a useful topic: How to best leverage the many business book summary services out there.

While you're there, check out the other proposals, as well. It's an interesting project -- and an interesting process!

You Don't Get There from Here #8

Carrie McNinch, P.O. Box 49403, Los Angeles, CA 90049; Web; Email
($2 36XS)

Daily, three-panel diary comic strips. Sent as trade for a Bundle of Wonder. Excellent.

ZYX #48

Arnold Skemer, 58-09 205th St., Bayside, NY 11364
(Free 10M)

Innovative poetry, and reviews of same. One of the best poetry zines I get.

Poet's Espresso: September 2008

1426 Telegraph Ave. #4, Stockton, CA 95204; Web; Email
($1, 28S)

Poetry from multiple poets in at least two languages, as well as local events listings.